Surviving (and thriving) at the Sambadrome

I can’t believe how quickly our time in Rio has disappeared already! Tomorrow we leave on the Oasis Overland truck ‘Dingo’ for pastures new, and I have little idea what to expect. I’m getting ready to take each day as it comes and to be open to whatever adventures are ahead.

But in the meantime – what a time we’ve had! Sambadrome loomed before us with the prospect of eight hours of partying through the night. Would I be able to handle it? Would it live up to the hype?

P1000490

Half party, half city – the two sides of Rio

For me, the answer was ABSOLUTELY. Sambadrome doesn’t just live up to the hype… it is the hype. I’ve never experienced anything like the electric energy that rocketed around the concrete stadium when the floats were in view. Everyone got into the spirit, dressing up in headbands and glitter – and some in full body paint and very little else! While I wasn’t one of those people who could dance all night, I did stay right up until the last float passed through the stands and the sun rose in the sky. It was an epic night/morning to say the least.

P1000433 P1000415 P1000461

We were in Sector 13, which is right at the end of the parade. There were many benefits to Sector 13 – it was a lot of fun to watch the dancers finish at the end and the chaos as they rushed to take their costumes off and join the party. You could easily find discarded costumes (they made for great pictures and cool – if unwieldy – souvenirs! I think there’s a purple alien head still in the hallway of our hotel) and you felt like part of the local scene. The downside is that we were quite far away from the main action itself and we didn’t feel like we could completely grasp the magnitude of the floats. The binoculars I had just offered a tantalising glimpse of the immense effort that went into every single detail of the parades. It would have been better to experience them in their full glory.

P1000484

Throwing away the costumes at the end… so sad!

P1000516

6am snoozes… when’s the next Samba school on?

It was definitely an immense way to kick off the trip – and something I will never forget.

Rio has been unforgettable in lots of ways. We went paragliding from Pedra Bonita – an incredible flight over the stunning beaches and coastline of the city. We wiled away an afternoon on Ipanema beach. We watched sunset from the base of Sugarloaf and drank beers on a seawall with the locals. We bought ridiculously cheap Havaianas in Copacabana (and promptly left them in a beachside bar… sigh). Lofty partied in Lapa and I wrote in the corner of an Irish pub.

G0012632 P1000530 P1000539

Finally, we toured the largest favela in South America – Rocinha – which over 70,000 people call home. We umm-ed and ahh-ed about doing this tour, but in the end we decided that it was the only way to get close to understanding the flipside of this capricious city. Of course, with bus-loads of tourists walking through it every day, Rocinha is one of the ‘safer’ favelas – but it was still eye-opening to see the conditions that still exist for over 3 million residents of Rio de Janeiro. The company that we used takes all the money for the tour and uses it to fund a day care and school inside the favela. While of course it felt uncomfortable to be essentially gawking at people’s lives (and all in the knowledge that we were leaving at the end), we were greeted with warm and open arms by the people we met there – and not just the ones who were taking money from us. I am glad that I went, if only to feel like I’m coming away with a more balanced view of this city and the country I’m about to explore even further.

P1000586

The view from the top of Rocinha favela

P1000590 P1000592 P1000603

All in all, Rio has lived up to its reputation. It’s incredibly beautiful, but it also has a dark side. On the same day that Lofty and I commented on how safe we’d felt the entire time we were here (and we did – we took money out of ATMs without issue, we took the metro at all hours, we partied at the blocos), some other members of our group were not so lucky. It just goes to show that both the raves and the warnings about Rio are true. If you are ever able to find yourself here, practice vigilance and be safe – but feel comfortable that even the bad is not enough to dim the good.

Rio just shines too brightly.

And if you need any further convincing, here’s our time in video form:

Follow:

Carnaval, Cariocas, Caipirinhas, Copacabana and Coconuts – our first couple of days in Rio de Janeiro

How do a million dancing, singing, happy people hide within a city block?

That’s what Gabby and I kept asking ourselves as we searched through the streets of Rio for the notorious Bloco Cordao da Bola Preta in the Central district. Where is the Bloco? We tried to follow the hordes of cariocas (the name given to people from Rio) and tourists alike in fancy dress, but they kept peeling off in different directions. Bloco? We asked one policeman. That way. Bloco? We asked a street vendor. He pointed the other way.

Then we turned a corner and heard it before we saw it: the rhythm of drums, the cheers from the crowd. Our eyes quickly caught up with our ears as we spotted a huge bus surrounded by a mass of humanity in brightly coloured costumes, feathers and headdresses, glitter and confetti everywhere. We squeezed our way through until we were right next to the samba school, dancing and drumming in time to the enthusiastic conducting of a woman on top of the bus. We samba-ed in our own gringo way in a slow march through the streets… laughing and cheering alongside a crowd who knew all the words to every song. Now this was the Carnaval we’d been looking for.

P1000338

We found a Bloco! Multibloco in Lapa

P1000323

Only it wasn’t. We hadn’t found Cordau da Bola Preta at all but stumbled into Multibloco in the Lapa district. Oh well, who cares! We had a blast and this is Rio baby. There’s plenty of partying to come.

*

From the moment we landed in Rio, one thing was clear: we were not in Disney World anymore. Our hotel, the Riazor, leaves a little to be desired… especially when you’re coming out of some pretty nice 5-star accommodation! But the rooms are clean and safe, the beds comfy, and the air-con and wifi both work – so what more can you ask for?

P1000212

Beautiful Copacabana beach

P1000219

Our first misty view of Cristo from the streets of Copacabana

P1000218

Thank god for these water tracks… they made walking on the beach bearable!

I wanted to get right into the spirit, so our first stop was Copacabana beach. Luckily the bonus of our hotel is that it is right by a metro station, so getting around the city is simple and safe. When we arrived, we had a traditional Brazilian lunch, which involved loading up as much food as possible onto a plate and paying by the weight – delicious. It was then only a short walk down to the beach. And what a beach. The sun was blazing and, despite it being a Thursday afternoon, the beach was packed. Thank god for the people who water the sand so it can be walked on – otherwise I might have burned the soles of my feet to a crisp!

After baptising our trip with a mandatory toe in the South Atlantic, we kicked back at a beach bar with a couple of Caipirihinas and a delicious agua de coco – although, admittedly, I probably drank too much too quickly. Combined with the exhaustion of the flight and the heat of the day, I was knackered and feeling a bit ill by the time we were ready to go out for dinner. Me, too unwell to eat? Almost unheard of. But it turned out a good night’s sleep was what I needed.

The next morning we were up bright and early for our tour of Rio. It was a great way to get oriented around the city and check off some of the major sights! And Rio did not disappoint at all. Our first stop was the Cristo Redentor (do what we did: get there early to avoid long lines at the bottom and monstrous crowds at the top!) and it was truly breathtaking.

P1000227

Cristo Redentor

DSC_1015

The crowds by Cristo, overlooking Sugar Loaf mountain

The tour also took us past a favela, into the district of Santa Teresa and to the main Metropolitan Cathedral, which was unlike any cathedral I’ve ever been in! It can hold 20,000 people at capacity, which is kind of mind-blowing.

DSC_1035

One of the most photographed favelas in Rio

GOPR0283

Inside the Catedral Metropolitana de Sao Sebastiao

Finally, we went up Sugar Loaf mountain in the cable cars to get absolutely stunning 360 views of Rio. What a town.

P1000294

On Sugarloaf mountain, with a view of Copacabana

P1000287

Inside the cable car

Thank goodness we had a good experience of Carnaval on Saturday morning, because Friday night can only be summed up as mildly disastrous. Owing to some misinformation from our Rio tour guide, we ended up arriving late to not one, but two blocos – arriving after the party only to find the masses of post-party drunk people still wandering the streets. Yes, there was still a bit of music but nothing like the fun, happy atmosphere we imagined.

As much as many blogs and articles I’ve read suggest simply ‘wandering the streets’ until you find a party, a little bit of pre-planning would have helped us have a much better night!

So far, Rio has been pretty amazing – even though I’m glad that this blog and my books give me an excuse to come home in the middle of the day to escape the heat and rest for the evening… Sambadrome is tomorrow, and I’m going to need all the energy my body can muster if I’m to survive the night!

P1000231

Typical tourist pose at Cristo – kind of has to be done!

 

Follow:

A Packing List for a Grown-Up Gap Year

KR and minion

It’s kind of amazing how travelling changes you. Opens you up to adventure, new experiences, new people. Only a few hours after we said goodbye to our families, switching from ‘vacation’ mode to ‘backpacker’, we met a Brazilian couple who gave us tips on everything from how to ward off the Zika virus to the best places to eat in Rio. We exchanged email addresses and they told us to get in touch if we needed anything once we arrived.

Travel magic at its best.

File 03-02-2016, 20 58 50

First official selfie of the trip – at Fort Lauderdale airport en route to Rio via Bogota

It’s officially been eight years since my last gap year – and in many ways, not much has changed. I’m older and (hopefully) wiser, but I’m still using the same backpack, sleeping bag and packing cubes as last time. The backpack in particular has seen many corners of the globe; she also accompanied my sister Sophie on her gap year adventure! I can definitely vouch for the longevity and durability of a Lowepro bag. I’m taking more or less the same amount of clothes, and I still remember that the most useful thing I brought with me was my sarong. But what has changed is the sheer amount of technology that is accompanying me this time around. Whereas in 2007 I travelled with a flip phone, iPod and a point-and-shoot camera, this time I feel like I’m carrying around my own Best Buy superstore. I guess that’s the burden that comes with being a ‘digital nomad’. I do have The Potion Diaries book 3 to write on the road, after all!

DSC_0980

Two backpackers ready for the road

Looking at this list all laid out, I’ve probably overpacked – and from everything I’ve heard, there will be plenty to buy in South America! The tricky thing has been to prepare for all the different temperatures that we’ll be encountering on our trip – from the sweltering heat of Brazil to the potentially very cold nights of Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego. Also, now that I’m closer to 30 than 21 (I turn 30 on this trip, ahh!) and this is supposed to be a grown-up gap year, I don’t want to feel like a ‘backpacker’ all the time. My solution is to bring jeans with me so I can go sit in a café and not feel too grungy. And if I’m ever wondering why my bag is so heavy, someone please remind me that I’ve packed five actual tree-books, in additional to my Kindle. Don’t judge me, I need them all! *clings to books*

Here’s my packing list, comprising my life for the next four months:

Clothing

1x aforementioned skinny jeans
1x grey hiking trousers
2x shorts
1x cut off trousers
1x jogging pants
3x sundresses
4x t-shirts
4x vest top
1x long sleeve shirt
8x underwear
3x bras
3x socks
1x long winter socks
1x thermal top
1x thermal pants/leggings
1x rain jacket
1x sweater/fleece
1x cardigan
1x beanie
1x gloves
3x bathing suit/bikini
1x sarong

Shoes

1x waterproof trainers
1x Merrell sandals
1x Flipflops
1x Butterfly twist flats

Medicine

Paracetemol + Ibuprofen
Anti-malarials
Bite cream
Solarcaine
Savlon (antiseptic cream)
Bio Oil
Immodium
Antihistamines
Birth control
Hand sanitizer
Band-aids

Toiletries

Sunscreen
Bug spray (75% Deet)
Solid shampoo from Lush
Deodorant
Razor
Make-up (mascara, concealer, bb cream, blush, lip salve, black eyeliner)
Dry shampoo
Mooncup
Toothbrush + toothpaste
Hand mirror
Nail scissors
Cotton swabs
Eye drops

Technology

Laptop + charger
Kindle Paperwhite + charger
iPhone 6 + charger + extra batttery
Waterproof Lumix camera + extra battery + charger
SD cards
External hard drive
Letouch 4-in-1 USB charger
Gopro (and a few accessories – a floating device, selfie stick)
Headphones + headphone splitter
Plug adaptors (for all variations – South America seems to have a ton of different variants when it comes to plugs!)
Withings watch (to track steps and sleep along the way – also works as an alarm clock)

Other

Writing notebook and pens
Books (to be exchanged on the road)
Passport + travel documents (including photocopies of passports and travel insurance documentation)
Flashlight + head torch
Binoculars
Toilet roll
Day bag + small side bag for the cities
Wallet
Sleeping Bag
Thermarest
Water bottle
Sewing kit
Trek towel
Travel lock
Sunglasses
Canada pins (to hand out along the way!)

But probably the most important items we’ve packed are our travel mascots… Kylo Ren and his minion! I initially bought a Disney Star Wars vinylmation hoping to get BB8 (it’s a lucky dip out of 8 different characters) but decided I wouldn’t mind getting Ren, Poe, Finn… but I ended up with Kylo. While initially I was a tad disappointed, it all works out now that Lofty’s mascot is a minion 😉 Look out for KR and minion showing up all over South America.

KR and minion – our intrepid travel companions

 

 

Follow:

A vacation to remember: WDW, Universal Studios and Celebrity Silhouette

It’s hard to describe the past couple of weeks, but I’m going to go with a single word: blissful. It’s been the perfect opportunity for Lofty and I to have some family time before the BIG trip begins – a vacation before the adventure. And what a vacation it was.

2016-01-19 11.30.34

The group at Hogsmeade!

We started off with a week at Disney’s Old Key West resort, where we celebrated Christmas (for the third time for most of us), played golf and did some shopping. The highlight was of course a trip to Universal Studios and Islands of Adventure – home to the Wizarding World of Harry Potter. Once again I was blown away by the imagination and the detail of the Harry Potter parks. Seeing scores of people – young and old – in long cloaks and wands, watching them cast spells to make jets of water fly through the air or upset cauldrons over unsuspecting onlookers… it’s literal magic. I must have had a look of awe permanently plastered on my face (the marker of a true HP fangirl) because as soon as I stepped into Ollivander’s, I was chosen to have my wand ‘choose’ me. As I spoke the magic words – Wingardium Leviosa – and a gust of wind lifted my hair to the singing of a choir – I was in. Sell me ten of those wands. Let me spend all my money on you, JKR and Warner Brothers.

IMG_8428

Finding my perfect wand at Ollivander’s…

IMG_8431

Hogwarts, of course

IMG_8418

Lofty & I outside Hogwarts

Okay, so all I bought was a Gryffindor-branded phone case, but the effect had definitely taken hold.

The rides are unbelievable too. These are no ordinary theme park rides – the hair-raising jaunt through Gringotts vault has some of the most sophisticated tech I’ve ever seen on a rollercoaster. Even the queues are fantastic (just look at the detail below as you step inside Gringotts bank). If you’re a fan and you ever get the chance to go, do it.

Inside Gringotts

2016-01-21 12.50.59

Diagon Alley

Our second week was aboard Celebrity Silhouette, sailing to Cozumel, Grand Cayman, Jamaica and Labadee in Haiti. Suffice to say, the cruise was incredible. The ship was pristine, the food delicious, service impeccable, and the ports… well, I think Labadee might move straight in as my favourite Caribbean destination ever.

P1000118

These two weeks of bliss have been like rays of sunshine, wonderful to bask in but also so bright they’ve obscured the view of everything that went before or that’s to come after. We’ve been living in a bubble where all our family is together in one place, where the sun is always shining, where food and cocktails appear on command (no magic wand required) and our every whims have been catered for. But from tomorrow, when we board the plane to Rio, we’re going to taking the first steps into a different kind of life. New people, new countries, new languages, new experiences… living out of a backpack and seeing where the road takes us!

It’s bound to be a wilder ride than the journey to a Gringotts bank vault. I hope to see some dragons too.

 

2016-01-29 10.50.06

Make sure to follow us on Instagram too! #alwardsontour

 

 

Follow:

It’s Over; I’m Home

17 countries. 259 days. Thousands of miles. 67 blog posts. 56 books. 1 stolen wallet. A million new friends. And I’m finally home.

 

I’m writing this from my place in Toronto with only a vague shimmer of a realization of what has happened to me over the past nine months. I have sat down to write this final entry so many times and yet… nothing. Even now I’m fighting the urge to put down the pen and turn on the TV or pour another cup of tea. It’s funny how quickly you settle back down into “life.”

 

The future is uncertain. Maybe that’s the reason I’m so against closing up this past. And although once again I’m going to find myself on the move – to the UK in the fall – there’s no ticket showing me where I’m going to end up and that’s disconcerting. But I am the eternal optimist.

 

I think no matter how much they try to deny it, all travellers are optimists. Only an optimist could stand on the side of the road and know that the next bus, bike, pick-up truck or car will take them to their next destination. Only optimists go alone to the middle of nowhere knowing they are sure to meet a kindred spirit in a bar to stave off the loneliness of “far from home.” Only an optimist can be sure that the very last dollar in their bank account is worth spending on yet another bus ride to yet another place. You have to know it will all work out alright, or else you wouldn’t have left in the first place.

 

Looking back over Sarah and my travel blogs is hilarious – it’s amazing what has changed and what has stayed the same. Team J-A-S broke up early on.  At least half of my original packing list got trashed in Africa and had to be replaced in Australia. We not only made it to the Aussie Open but scored incredible seats. My first reference to Lofty is as “a friend from Stray bus.”  The most useful item I brought with me turned out to be my sarong.

 

One thing I did get right is that this trip changed my life. One thing I got wrong is that this was a “once in a lifetime.” I’ll be the first to admit, I’ve caught the bug! Travel will always be high on my priority list. South America calls, as does China, Japan, the Middle East and most accessibly, Europe. Is that the whole world yet?

 

My favourite country was New Zealand, followed closely by Zimbabwe (just don’t get me started on Mugabe). My favourite city was Cape Town, then Melbourne. The best island was Zanzibar. The best beach Matai Bay in northern NZ. The best dive in Fiji. The most relaxing moment? A tie between gliding through the Okavango Delta in a makoro and having a Thai massage on Chaweng beach. Finally, the scariest moments: standing on the edge of Bloukrans Bridge, rolling a car outside Brisbane and approaching the bone-filled stupa at the Cheung-Ek Killing Fields.

 

I learned so much – how to scuba dive, how to survive in the desert, how to surf, how to sky dive, how to make a killer tom yum gai soup, what to do if a lion/rhino/elephant starts to charge you. The Oasis tour in Africa was fantastic and I made so many friends for life. I would recommend it to anyone. For that matter, I would recommend travelling to everyone.

 

Compared to the hundreds of travellers I met on my trip, it’s not as if I had a more exciting itinerary than anyone; tried harder to get off the beaten track; visited more remote islands and exotic places; felt more alive or been closer to death. Most of them are still going and I am back home. But that’s the beauty of it. I know how accessible the world is, now. It can happen for anyone. It could happen for you, if it’s what you truly want to do.

 

Final words of travel wisdom? Trek towels stink. Exchange books at secondhand stores. Never refuse an invitation. Remember that – just as rules are made to be broken – plans are made to be changed.

 

Always use the hostel kitchen. You never know who you might meet.

Follow: